Hate groups

FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2005, file photo, Edgar Ray Killen sits in court in Philadelphia, Miss. Killen, a former Ku Klux Klan leader who was convicted in the 1964 "Mississippi Burning" slayings of three civil rights workers, died in prison at the age of 92, the state's corrections department announced Friday, Jan. 12, 2018. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
January 12, 2018 - 10:36 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi's corrections department says Edgar Ray Killen, a former Ku Klux Klan leader who was convicted in the 1964 'Mississippi Burning' slayings of three civil rights workers, has died in prison at the age of 92. The part-time preacher and lumber mill operator was 80 when...
Read More
This undated photo provided by the Mississippi Department of Corrections shows Edgar Ray Killen, a former Ku Klux Klan leader who was convicted in the 1964 "Mississippi Burning" slayings of three civil rights workers. Killen died in prison at the age of 92, the state's corrections department announced Friday, Jan. 12, 2018. (Mississippi Department of Corrections via AP)
January 12, 2018 - 1:26 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Edgar Ray Killen, a 1960s Ku Klux Klan leader who was convicted decades later in the "Mississippi Burning" slayings of three civil rights workers, has died in prison at the age of 92, the state's corrections department announced Friday. The one-time Klan leader was serving...
Read More
File - This June 7, 2017 file photo provided by the Pinellas County Sheriff's Office shows Brandon Russell. The neo-Nazi group leader who stockpiled explosive material in the Florida apartment where a friend killed two roommates was sentenced to five years in federal prison. The sentence, handed down Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in a Tampa federal court against Russell, was less than the 11 years sought by prosecutors. (Pinellas County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
January 09, 2018 - 4:57 pm
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Federal prosecutors said Brandon Russell is a dangerous Neo-Nazi leader who had lethal bomb-making materials in his Florida apartment. His mother and grandmother called him a follower who liked to please his friends. At the end of a four-hour court hearing Tuesday, a federal...
Read More
FILE- In this undated photo released by the Southern Poverty Law Center's Dan Chung, Tanya Gersh poses for a photo. Gersh, a Montana real estate agent, sued the founder of a neo-Nazi website Andrew Anglin, accusing him of orchestrating an anti-Semitic internet trolling campaign that terrorized her family amid her dispute with the mother of a leading white nationalist. Anglin has dubiously claimed he lives in Nigeria. A federal judge in Montana has warned Anglin's attorneys that he won't tolerate any "game-playing" and expects him to disclose where he has been residing, according to a court transcript obtained by The Associated Press. (Dan Chung/Southern Poverty Law Center via AP)
December 28, 2017 - 5:24 pm
Andrew Anglin, founder of a neo-Nazi website notorious for its racist internet trolling campaigns, has dubiously claimed he lives in Nigeria. A process server swears he recently spotted The Daily Stormer's publisher at a grocery store in his native Ohio. Anglin's whereabouts — a key issue in a pair...
Read More
File- In this Aug. 18, 2017, photo, a statue of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest sits in a park in Memphis, Tenn. A city council in Tennessee has voted to sell two city parks where two Confederate statues are located and crews have begun work to remove one of them. The Commercial Appeal reports Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said in a tweet Wednesday, Dec. 20, 2017, that the parks were sold and that work underway there complies with state law. The city council unanimously approved the sale Wednesday to a private entity. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz, File)
December 21, 2017 - 3:24 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A private group headed by a county commissioner and fueled by anonymous donations bought two parks from the city of Memphis at little cost this week, allowing for the swift removal of two Confederate statues that had sparked conflict for years. Shelby County Commissioner and...
Read More
FILE- In this Aug. 14, 2017 file photo, Susan Bro, the mother of Heather Heyer, holds a photo of Bro's mother and her daughter, in Charlottesville, Va. Heyer was struck and killed by a car while protesting a white nationalist rally on Aug. 12. The city of Charlottesville is preparing to dedicate a downtown street in her honor. (AP Photo/Joshua Replogle, File)
December 19, 2017 - 7:08 pm
Charlottesville is set to honor a young woman killed when a car plowed into a crowd protesting a white nationalist rally by dedicating part of the street where the attack occurred to her. The Virginia city is holding a ceremony Wednesday morning to designate "Honorary Heather Heyer Way." Among...
Read More
FILE - In a Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017 file photo, Charlottesville Police Chief Al S. Thomas Jr. exits the memorial service for Heather Heyer, at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville, Va. Heyer was killed when a car rammed into a crowd of people protesting a white nationalist rally. Thomas Jr., who was criticized over the department's response to the violent white nationalist rally this summer, announced his retirement Monday, Dec. 18, 2017, effective immediately. (Andrew Shurtleff/The Daily Progress via AP, Pool, File)
December 19, 2017 - 12:11 am
The first African-American police chief of Charlottesville, Virginia, abruptly retired Monday, about two weeks after a scathing independent review criticized his "slow-footed response" to violence at a white nationalist rally this summer. In a brief statement, the city did not give a reason for...
Read More
This Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, photo shows a Twitter sign outside of the company's headquarters in San Francisco. Twitter will be enforcing stricter policies on violent and abusive content such as hateful images or symbols, including those attached to user profiles, the company announced Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
December 18, 2017 - 4:20 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Twitter suspended the accounts of well-known white nationalists Monday, moving swiftly to enforce its new rules aimed at reducing what it deems abusive content. The account of far-right group Britain First, a small group that regularly posts inflammatory videos purporting to show...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 12, 2017 file photo, people fly into the air as a vehicle is driven into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va. James Alex Fields Jr., the man accused of driving into the crowd demonstrating against a white nationalist protest, killing one person and injuring many more, has a preliminary court hearing Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. (Ryan M. Kelly/The Daily Progress via AP, File)
December 15, 2017 - 7:28 am
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — The man accused of driving into a crowd protesting a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville faces a new charge of first-degree murder after a court hearing Thursday in which prosecutors presented surveillance video and other evidence against him. Prosecutors...
Read More
Former U.S. Attorney Tim Heaphy presents his findings of an investigation about the Aug. 12 "Unite the Right" rally to the Charlottesville city council on Monday, Dec. 4, 2017. The Charlottesville City Council is meeting for the first time since the former federal prosecutor released a report sharply critical of the government and law enforcement response to a white nationalist rally this summer. (Ryan M. Kelly/The Daily Progress via AP)
December 05, 2017 - 4:37 am
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — The sharp divisions between Charlottesville residents and their elected leaders and police were on display at a tense, raucous City Council meeting, the first since the release of a scathing report on officials' response to a white nationalist rally this summer. Former U...
Read More

Pages